15 September 2010

Idol Island and Eating Cockroaches

The constitutional shenanigans at Parliament this week have distracted me from updating folk about my continuing survival on the island of Academic Idol.  Down to the final four.

But it seems this week I am truly going hungry - and I am consigned to eating cockroaches!

http://www.salient.org.nz/blog/academic-idol-round-seven-2

Q: The Vice Chancellor, your top student and your favourite movie star are around for dinner. To your HORROR you discover that your lazy chef has only cooked enough food for three. Who do you boot out onto the street hungry? And why?

"Dean Knight, Law

Beware—it’s a trap! Students would rejoice if I showed Uncle Pat the door. The establishment turning on itself. Our VC being forced to eat bread and water, like the impecunious students burdened by his escalating fees and levies. But, no. I’ve engaged in such career-limiting behaviour before. And have learnt my lesson.

Oust my top student(s)? Unfair. And Idol suicide. They deserve praise. And lattes. Not loneliness.

And spurn Colin Farrell? Never…!
Finally, I could never deny my Samoan husband a delicious home-cooked meal. We have a pact. I cook. He plays piano. Perfect harmony.

No. It’s me who must be sacrificed… Hungry, for the greater good!"

To vote:
- Text "Dean Knight" to 027 CUSTARD (+64-27-287-8273) or email editor@salient.org.nz

For updates, there's a facebook page:
- http://www.facebook.com/pages/Dean-Knight-for-Academic-Idol/136733993026908?ref=ts

Naked self-promotion I know, but it's now the business end of the competition...

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Course Outline

Lord Justice Lawton in Maxwell v Department of Trade and Industry [1974] 2 All ER 122 said:

"From time to time ... lawyers and judges have tried to define what constitutes fairness. Like defining an elephant, it is not easy to do, although fairness in practice has the elephantine quality of being easy to recognise. As a result of these efforts a word in common usage has acquired the trappings of legalism: 'acting fairly' has become 'acting in accordance with the rules of natural justice', and on occasion has been dressed up with Latin tags. This phrase in my opinion serves no useful purpose and in recent years it has encouraged lawyers to try to put those who hold inquiries into legal straitjackets.... For the purposes of my judgment I intend to ask myself this simple question: did the [decision-maker] act fairly towards the plaintiff?"


This course examines the elephantine concept of fairness in the law, along with other contemporary legal issues.

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